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dc.contributor.authorNelms SEen
dc.contributor.authorBarnett Jen
dc.contributor.authorBrownlow Aen
dc.contributor.authorDavison NJen
dc.contributor.authorDeaville Ren
dc.contributor.authorGalloway TSen
dc.contributor.authorLindeque PKen
dc.contributor.authorSantillo Den
dc.contributor.authorGodley BJen
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-18T10:42:26Z
dc.date.available2019-02-18T10:42:26Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citation9:1075en
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-37428-3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11262/11590
dc.description.abstractPlastic pollution represents a pervasive and increasing threat to marine ecosystems worldwide and there is a need to better understand the extent to which microplastics (<5 mm) are ingested by high trophic-level taxa, such as marine mammals. Here, we perform a comprehensive assessment by examining whole digestive tracts of 50 individuals from 10 species whilst operating strict contamination controls. Microplastics were ubiquitous with particles detected in every animal examined. The relatively low number per animal (mean = 5.5) suggests these particles are transitory. Stomachs, however, were found to contain a greater number than intestines, indicating a potential site of temporary retention. The majority of particles were fibres (84%) while the remaining 16% was fragments. Particles were mainly blue and black (42.5% and 26.4%) in colour and Nylon was the most prevalent (60%) polymer type. A possible relationship was found between the cause of death category and microplastic abundance, indicating that animals that died due to infectious diseases had a slightly higher number of particles than those that died of trauma and other drivers of mortality. It is not possible, however, to draw any firm conclusions on the potential biological significance of this observation and further research is required to better understand the potential chronic effects of microplastic exposure on animal health, particularly as marine mammals are widely considered important sentinels for the implications of pollution for the marine environment.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.isformatof15033en
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reportsen
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
dc.subjectAnimal physiologyen
dc.subjectConservation biologyen
dc.titleMicroplastics in marine mammals stranded around the British coast: ubiquitous but transitory?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.description.versionVersion of Record
rioxxterms.publicationdate2019-01-31
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-11-30
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.dateDeposit2019-02-18
refterms.depositExceptionpublishedGoldOAen
refterms.depositExceptionExplanationGoldOAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.versionVoRen


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