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dc.contributor.authorWhitfield Sen
dc.contributor.authorBeauchamp Een
dc.contributor.authorBoyd DSen
dc.contributor.authorBurslem Den
dc.contributor.authorByg Aen
dc.contributor.authorColledge Fen
dc.contributor.authorCutler MEJen
dc.contributor.authorDidena Men
dc.contributor.authorDougill Aen
dc.contributor.authorFoody Gen
dc.contributor.authorGodbold JAen
dc.contributor.authorHazenbosch Men
dc.contributor.authorHirons Men
dc.contributor.authorSperanza CIen
dc.contributor.authorJew Een
dc.contributor.authorLacambra Cen
dc.contributor.authorMkwambisi Den
dc.contributor.authorMoges Aen
dc.contributor.authorMorel Aen
dc.contributor.authorMorris Ren
dc.contributor.authorNovo Pen
dc.contributor.authorRueda Men
dc.contributor.authorSmith Hen
dc.contributor.authorSolan Men
dc.contributor.authorSpencer Ten
dc.contributor.authorThornton Aen
dc.contributor.authorTouza Jen
dc.contributor.authorWhite PCLen
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-04T11:32:27Z
dc.date.available2019-02-04T11:32:27Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citation55en
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2019.01.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11262/11581
dc.description.abstractIn a context of both long-term climatic changes and short-term climatic shocks, temporal dynamics profoundly influence ecosystems and societies. In low income contexts in the Tropics, where both exposure and vulnerability to climatic fluctuations is high, the frequency, duration, and trends in these fluctuations are important determinants of socio-ecological resilience. In this paper, the dynamics of six diverse socio-ecological systems (SES) across the Tropics – ranging from agricultural and horticultural systems in Africa and Oceania to managed forests in South East Asia and coastal systems in South America – are examined in relation to the 2015–16 El Niño, and the longer context of climatic variability in which this short-term ‘event’ occurred. In each case, details of the socio-ecological characteristics of the systems and the climate phenomena experienced during the El Niño event are described and reflections on the observed impacts of, and responses to it are presented. Drawing on these cases, we argue that SES resilience (or lack of) is, in part, a product of both long-term historical trends, as well as short-term shocks within this history. Political and economic lock-ins and dependencies, and the memory and social learning that originates from past experience, all contribute to contemporary system resilience. We propose that the experiences of climate shocks can provide a window of insight into future ecosystem responses and, when combined with historical perspectives and learning from multiple contexts and cases, can be an important foundation for efforts to build appropriate long-term resilience strategies to mediate impacts of changing and uncertain climates.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.isformatof15018en
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Environmental Changeen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
dc.subjectClimate changeen
dc.subjectVariabilityen
dc.subjectTemporal dynamicsen
dc.subjectResistanceen
dc.subjectPerturbationsen
dc.subjectSocietiesen
dc.subjectEcosystemsen
dc.titleExploring temporality in socio-ecological resilience through experiences of the 2015-16 El Niño across the Tropicsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.description.versionVersion of Record
dc.extent.pageNumbers1-14en
rioxxterms.publicationdate2019-01-23
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-01-13
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.dateDeposit2019-02-04
refterms.depositExceptionpublishedGoldOAen
refterms.depositExceptionExplanationGoldOAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.versionVoRen


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