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dc.contributor.authorTsairidou Sen
dc.contributor.authorAllen Aen
dc.contributor.authorBanos Gen
dc.contributor.authorCoffey MPen
dc.contributor.authorAnacleto Oen
dc.contributor.authorByrne AWen
dc.contributor.authorSkuce RAen
dc.contributor.authorGlass EJen
dc.contributor.authorWoolliams JAen
dc.contributor.authorDoeschl-Wilson ABen
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-17T10:21:36Z
dc.date.available2019-01-17T10:21:36Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citation5:310en
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fvets.2018.00310
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11262/11571
dc.description.abstractHost resistance and infectivity are genetic traits affecting infectious disease transmission. This Perspective discusses the potential exploitation of genetic variation in cattle infectivity, in addition to resistance, to reduce the risk, and prevalence of bovine tuberculosis (bTB). In bTB, variability in M. bovis shedding has been previously reported in cattle and wildlife hosts (badgers and wild boars), but the observed differences were attributed to dose and route of infection, rather than host genetics. This article addresses the extent to which cattle infectivity may play a role in bTB transmission, and discusses the feasibility, and potential benefits from incorporating infectivity into breeding programmes. The underlying hypothesis is that bTB infectivity, like resistance, is partly controlled by genetics. Identifying and reducing the number of cattle with high genetic infectivity, could reduce further a major risk factor for herds exposed to bTB. We outline evidence in support of this hypothesis and describe methodologies for detecting and estimating genetic parameters for infectivity. Using genetic-epidemiological prediction models we discuss the potential benefits of selection for reduced infectivity and increased resistance in terms of practical field measures of epidemic risk and severity. Simulations predict that adding infectivity to the breeding programme could enhance and accelerate the reduction in breakdown risk compared to selection on resistance alone. Therefore, given the recent launch of genetic evaluations for bTB resistance and the UK government's goal to eradicate bTB, it is timely to consider the potential of integrating infectivity into breeding schemes.en
dc.description.sponsorshipScottish Government RESASen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.isformatof15007en
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Veterinary Scienceen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2018 Tsairidou, Allen, Banos, Coffey, Anacleto, Byrne, Skuce, Glass, Woolliams and Doeschl-Wilson. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
dc.subjectDisease resistanceen
dc.subjectDisease controlen
dc.subjectAnimal breedingen
dc.subjectInfectivityen
dc.subjectBovine tuberculosisen
dc.titleCan we breed cattle for lower bovine TB infectivity?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.description.versionVersion of Record
rioxxterms.publicationdate2018-12-07
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-11-22
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.dateDeposit2019-01-17
refterms.depositExceptionpublishedGoldOAen
refterms.depositExceptionExplanationGoldOAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.versionVoRen


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