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dc.contributor.authorZhou Gen
dc.contributor.authorCao Wen
dc.contributor.authorBai Jen
dc.contributor.authorXu Cen
dc.contributor.authorZeng Nen
dc.contributor.authorGao Sen
dc.contributor.authorRees RMen
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-07T13:05:35Z
dc.date.available2019-01-07T13:05:35Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citation436:1-2
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-018-03926-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11262/11560
dc.description.abstractAims We studied the effects of mixing rice straw and hairy vetch plant residues in a subtropical paddy soil, on subsequent carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics. Methods Using a theoretical framework, we designed two groups of experiments (involving equal amounts of residual C or N addition, referred to as either C or N treatments). Each experiment included mixed residues of rice straw and hairy vetch at different mixing ratios. Soils together with residues were incubated at 25 °C under waterlogged conditions for 100 days. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and soil C and N fractions were measured continuously. Results Both C and N treatments affected soil C and N dynamics, and these dynamics were quantitatively dependent on residue C/N ratios. The effect of residue mixtures on C and N dynamics could not be predicted from single residues, since there were non-additive effects of residue mixtures. Synergistic effects were generally more frequent than antagonistic effects. Residue mixtures tended to enhance CO2 and CH4 emissions in both C and N treatments but decreased N2O emissions in the N treatment. In the N treatment, dissolved organic C (DOC), dissolved organic N (DON), and microbial biomass C (MBC) concentrations increased. DOC and DON concentrations decreased in the C treatment. Residue mixtures enhanced the global warming potentials (GWP) of greenhouse gases (GHG) emitted from soil by non-additive synergistic effects. The C/N ratio of residue mixtures affected the non-additive responses of soil C and N dynamics, for example mixtures with a C/N ratio of 25 had higher CO2 emissions and DOC concentrations than those with a C/N ratio of 35 as a consequence of non-additive effects, however, CH4 emissions and MBC concentrations were higher in mixtures with a C/N ratio of 35 than in mixtures with a C/N ration of 25. Conclusions These results indicated that non-additive effects can impact soil C and N dynamics and that residue C/N ratios play an important role in influencing non-additive effects. Applying a single residue to paddy soils may be better than residue mixtures from a GWP mitigation perspective.en
dc.description.sponsorshipBBSRC grant no.: BB/N013484/1en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.isformatof15001en
dc.relation.ispartofPlant and Soilen
dc.rightsCopyright © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2019. This is the accepted version of the above article. The final publication is available at Springer via https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-018-03926-6
dc.subjectResidue mixturesen
dc.subjectC/N ratioen
dc.subjectSoil C and N dynamicsen
dc.subjectNon-additive responseen
dc.subjectPaddy soilen
dc.titleNon-additive responses of soil C and N to rice straw and hairy vetch (Vicia villosa roth L) mixtures in a paddy soilen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscript
dc.extent.pageNumbers229-244
rioxxterms.publicationdate2019-01-07
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-12-19
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.dateDeposit2019-01-07
refterms.dateEmbargoEnd2020-01-07
refterms.dateFreeToDownload2020-01-07
refterms.dateFreeToRead2020-01-07
refterms.dateToSearch2020-01-07
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.versionAMen


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