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dc.contributor.authorHuws SAen
dc.contributor.authorCreevey Cen
dc.contributor.authorOyama LBen
dc.contributor.authorMizrahi Ien
dc.contributor.authorDenman SEen
dc.contributor.authorPopova Men
dc.contributor.authorMunoz-tamayo Ren
dc.contributor.authorForano Een
dc.contributor.authorWaters SMen
dc.contributor.authorHess Men
dc.contributor.authorTapio Ien
dc.contributor.authorSmidt Hen
dc.contributor.authorKrizsan Sen
dc.contributor.authorYanez-Ruiz DRen
dc.contributor.authorBelanche Aen
dc.contributor.authorGuan LLen
dc.contributor.authorGruninger RJen
dc.contributor.authorMcAllister Ten
dc.contributor.authorNewbold Jen
dc.contributor.authorRoehe Ren
dc.contributor.authorDewhurst RJen
dc.contributor.authorSnelling TJen
dc.contributor.authorWatson Men
dc.contributor.authorSuen Gen
dc.contributor.authorHart Een
dc.contributor.authorKingston-Smith Aen
dc.contributor.authorScollan Nen
dc.contributor.authorDo Prado RMen
dc.contributor.authorPilau Een
dc.contributor.authorMantovani HCen
dc.contributor.authorAttwood GTen
dc.contributor.authorEdwards JEen
dc.contributor.authorMcEwan Nen
dc.contributor.authorMorrison Sen
dc.contributor.authorMayorga Oen
dc.contributor.authorElliott Cen
dc.contributor.authorMorgavi DPen
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-26T09:24:26Z
dc.date.available2018-09-26T09:24:26Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citation9:2161
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2018.02161
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11262/11523
dc.description.abstractThe rumen is a complex ecosystem composed of anaerobic bacteria, protozoa, fungi, methanogenic archaea and phages. These microbes interact closely to breakdown plant material that is inedible for humans, whilst providing metabolic energy to the host and producing methane. Consequently, ruminants produce meat and milk, which are rich in high quality protein, vitamins and minerals and therefore contribute to food security. As world population is predicted to reach approximately 9.7 billion by 2050, ruminant production has to increase to satisfy global protein demand, despite limited land availability, whilst ensuring environmental impact is minimised. These goals can be met by deepening our understanding of the rumen microbiome. Attempts to manipulate the rumen microbiome to benefit global agricultural challenges have been ongoing for decades with limited success, mostly due to the lack of a detailed understanding of this microbiome and our limited ability to culture most of these microbes outside the rumen. The potential to manipulate the rumen microbiome and meet global livestock challenges through animal breeding and introduction of dietary interventions during early life have recently emerged as promising new technologies. Our inability to phenotype ruminants in a high-throughput manner has also hampered progress, although the recent increase in ‘omic’ data may allow further development of mathematical models and rumen microbial gene biomarkers as proxies. Advances in computational tools, high-throughput sequencing technologies and cultivation-independent ‘omics’ approaches continue to revolutionise our understanding of the rumen microbiome. This will ultimately provide the knowledge framework needed to solve current and future ruminant livestock challenges.en
dc.description.sponsorshipBBSRC grant no. BB/N01720X/1; Scottish Government RESAS Strategic Research Programmeen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.isformatof14921en
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Microbiologyen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2018 Huws, Creevey, Oyama, Mizrahi, Denman, Popova, Muñoz-Tamayo, Forano, Waters, Hess, Tapio, Smidt, Krizsan, Yáñez-Ruiz, Belanche, Guan, Gruninger, McAllister, Newbold, Roehe, Dewhurst, Snelling, Watson, Suen, Hart, Kingston-Smith, Scollan, do Prado, Pilau, Mantovani, Attwood, Edwards, McEwan, Morrisson, Mayorga, Elliott and Morgavi. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
dc.subjectMetaproteomicsen
dc.subjectMetabolomicsen
dc.subjectRumenen
dc.subjectMicrobiomeen
dc.subjectHosten
dc.subjectDieten
dc.subjectProductionen
dc.subjectMethaneen
dc.subjectOmicsen
dc.subjectMetataxonomicsen
dc.subjectMetagenomicsen
dc.subjectMetatranscriptomicsen
dc.titleAddressing global ruminant agricultural challenges through understanding the rumen microbiome: past, present and futureen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.description.versionVersion of Record
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-08-23
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.versionNAen


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