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dc.contributor.authorSandor Ren
dc.contributor.authorEhrhardt Fen
dc.contributor.authorBrilli Len
dc.contributor.authorCarozzi Men
dc.contributor.authorRecous Sen
dc.contributor.authorSmith Pen
dc.contributor.authorSnow Ven
dc.contributor.authorSoussana J-Fen
dc.contributor.authorDorich CDen
dc.contributor.authorFuchs Ken
dc.contributor.authorFitton Nen
dc.contributor.authorGongadze Ken
dc.contributor.authorKlumpp Ken
dc.contributor.authorLiebig Men
dc.contributor.authorMartin Ren
dc.contributor.authorMerbold Len
dc.contributor.authorNewton PCDen
dc.contributor.authorRees RMen
dc.contributor.authorRolinski Sen
dc.contributor.authorBellocchi Gen
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-12T13:27:09Z
dc.date.available2018-06-12T13:27:09Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citation642en
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.06.020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11262/11461
dc.description.abstractSimulation models quantify the impacts on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in grassland systems caused by changes in management practices. To support agricultural policies, it is however important to contrast the responses of alternative models, which can differ greatly in their treatment of key processes and in their response to management. We applied eight biogeochemical models at five grassland sites (in France, New Zealand, Switzerland, United Kingdom and United States) to compare the sensitivity of modelled C and N fluxes to changes in the density of grazing animals (from 100% to 50% of the original livestock densities), also in combination with decreasing N fertilization levels (reduced to zero from the initial levels). Simulated multi-model median values indicated that input reduction would lead to an increase in the C sink strength (negative net ecosystem C exchange) in intensive grazing systems: −64 ± 74 g C m−2 yr−1 (animal density reduction) and −81 ± 74 g C m−2 yr−1 (N and animal density reduction), against the baseline of −30.5 ± 69.5 g C m−2 yr−1 (LSU [livestock units] ≥ 0.76 ha−1 yr−1). Simulations also indicated a strong effect of N fertilizer reduction on N fluxes, e.g. N2O-N emissions decreased from 0.34 ± 0.22 (baseline) to 0.1 ± 0.05 g N m−2 yr−1 (no N fertilization). Simulated decline in grazing intensity had only limited impact on the N balance. The simulated pattern of enteric methane emissions was dominated by high model-to-model variability. The reduction in simulated offtake (animal intake + cut biomass) led to a doubling in net primary production per animal (increased by 11.6 ± 8.1 t C LSU−1 yr−1 across sites). The highest N2O-N intensities (N2O-N/offtake) were simulated at mown and extensively grazed arid sites. We show the possibility of using grassland models to determine sound mitigation practices while quantifying the uncertainties associated with the simulated outputs.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.isformatof14874en
dc.relation.ispartofScience of the Total Environmenten
dc.rightsCopyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available after the end of the 12 month embargo period under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectSensitivity analysisen
dc.subjectProcess-based modelen
dc.subjectNitrogen fertilizationen
dc.subjectLivestock densityen
dc.subjectGHG emission intensityen
dc.titleThe use of biogeochemical models to evaluate mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from managed grasslandsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscript
dc.extent.pageNumbers292-306en
rioxxterms.publicationdate2018-06-12
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-06-02
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.dateDeposit2018-06-12
refterms.dateEmbargoEnd2019-06-12
refterms.dateFreeToDownload2019-06-12
refterms.dateFreeToRead2019-06-12
refterms.dateToSearch2019-06-12
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.versionAMen


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