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dc.contributor.authorHarris-Bridge Gen
dc.contributor.authorYoung Len
dc.contributor.authorHandel Ien
dc.contributor.authorFarish Men
dc.contributor.authorMason Cen
dc.contributor.authorMitchell MAen
dc.contributor.authorHaskell MJen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-30T12:22:23Z
dc.date.available2018-05-30T12:22:23Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citation237
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.tvjl.2018.05.008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11262/11458
dc.description.abstractLameness in dairy cattle is a persistent problem, indicating pain caused by underlying disease states and is associated with reduced milk yields. Digital dermatitis is a common cause of lameness. Thermal imaging is a technique that may facilitate early detection of this disease and has the potential for use in automated detection systems. Previous studies with thermal imaging have imaged either the heels or the coronary band of the foot and typically only used the maximum temperature (Max) value as the outcome measure. This study investigated the utility of other statistical descriptors: 90th percentile (90PCT), 95th percentile (95PCT), standard deviation (SD) and coefficient of variation (CoV) and compared the utility of imaging the heel or coronary band. Images were collected from lame and healthy cows using a high-resolution thermal camera. Analyses were done at the cow and foot level. There were significant differences between lame and healthy feet detectable at the heels (95th percentile: P < 0.05; SD: P < 0.05) and coronary band (SD: P < 0.05). Within lame cows, 95PCT values were higher at the heel (P < 0.05) and Max values were higher at the coronary band (P < 0.05) in the lame foot compared to the healthy foot. ROC analysis showed an AUC value of 0.72 for Max temperature and 0.68 for 95PCT at the heels. It was concluded that maximum temperature is the most accurate measure, but other statistical descriptors of temperature can be used to detect lameness. These may be useful in certain contexts, such as where there is contamination. Differentiation of lame from healthy feet was most apparent when imaging the heels.en
dc.description.sponsorshipScottish Government RESAS Strategic Research Programme (WP6.3)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.isformatof14870en
dc.relation.ispartofThe Veterinary Journalen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available after the end of the 12 month embargo period under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectLamenessen
dc.subjectDairy cattleen
dc.subjectThermal imagingen
dc.subjectDisease detectionen
dc.titleThe use of infrared thermography for detecting digital dermatitis in dairy cattle: What is the best measure of temperature and foot location to use?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscript
dc.extent.pageNumbers26-33
rioxxterms.publicationdate2018-05-28
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-05-24
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.dateDeposit2018-05-30
refterms.dateEmbargoEnd2019-05-28
refterms.dateFreeToDownload2019-05-28
refterms.dateFreeToRead2019-05-28
refterms.dateToSearch2019-05-28
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.versionNAen


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