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dc.contributor.authorFirbank LGen
dc.contributor.authorAttwood Sen
dc.contributor.authorEory Ven
dc.contributor.authorGadanakis Yen
dc.contributor.authorLynch JMen
dc.contributor.authorSonnino Ren
dc.contributor.authorTakahashi Ten
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-12T08:35:18Z
dc.date.available2018-04-12T08:35:18Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citation2:7en
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fsufs.2018.00007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11262/11424
dc.description.abstractArguably the greatest grand challenge for humankind is to keep the biosphere within its safe and just operating space, providing sufficient resources to meet people’s needs without exceeding the Earth’s capacity to supply them (Raworth, 2012). “Safe” is defined in terms of keeping planetary environmental processes, through mechanisms such as climate regulation and improved nutrient cycles, within limits over the long term (Rockstrom et al., 2009). “Just” is increasingly being interpreted in terms of meeting the UN Sustainable Development Goals, with targets addressing various forms of equity as well as biophysical needs (Griggs et al., 2013). Keeping the biosphere within the operating space requires that we produce the food we need, along with the ecosystem and socioeconomic goods and services we require (Garnett et al., 2013). By definition, achieving this challenge also means achieving the sustainable intensification (SI) of agriculture, whereby more food is produced from the same area of land (or water), with reduced or reversed negative environmental impacts accompanied by a range of positive societal and environmental co-benefits. SI is variously considered as a goal (Royal Society, 2009), a process (Firbank et al., 2013), a trade-off between economic production activity and ecological performance (Gadanakis et al., 2015), or a suite of interventions (Godfray and Garnett, 2014).en
dc.description.sponsorshipScottish Government RESAS Strategic Research Programme (RD2.3.5; SD1)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.isformatof14804en
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Sustainable Food Systemsen
dc.rights© 2018 Firbank, Attwood, Eory, Gadanakis, Lynch, Sonnino and Takahashi. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
dc.subjectSafe and just operating spaceen
dc.subjectUN Sustainable Development Goalsen
dc.subjectLand useen
dc.subjectPlace-baseden
dc.subjectFood securityen
dc.titleGrand challenges in sustainable intensification and ecosystem servicesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.description.versionVersion of record
rioxxterms.publicationdate2018-03-28
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-03-13
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.dateDeposit2018-04-12
refterms.depositExceptionpublishedGoldOAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.versionVoRen


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