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dc.contributor.authorBall BCen
dc.contributor.authorHargreaves PRen
dc.contributor.authorWatson CAen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-29T11:29:58Z
dc.date.available2017-11-29T11:29:58Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn0044-7447
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s13280-017-0965-z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11262/11352
dc.description.abstractGlobally soil quality and food security continue to decrease indicating that agriculture and the food system need to adapt. Improving connection to the soil by knowledge exchange can help achieve this. We propose a framework of three types of connections that allow the targeting of appropriate messages to different groups of people. Direct connection by, for example, handling soil develops soil awareness for management that can be fostered by farmers joining groups on soil-focused farming such as organic farming or no-till. Indirect connections between soil, food and ecosystem services can inform food choices and environmental awareness in the public and can be promoted by, for example, gardening, education and art. Temporal connection revealed from past usage of soil helps to bring awareness to policy workers of the need for the long-term preservation of soil quality for environmental conservation. The understanding of indirect and temporal connections can be helped by comparing them with the operations of the networks of soil organisms and porosity that sustain soil fertility and soil functions.en
dc.description.sponsorshipScottish Government RESAS Strategic Research Programme (RD2.3.8)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.isformatof14732en
dc.relation.ispartofAmbioen
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author(s) 2017. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectAgroecologyen
dc.subjectDiversityen
dc.subjectIntegrationen
dc.subjectSoil qualityen
dc.titleA framework of connections between soil and people can help improve sustainability of the food system and soil functionsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.description.versionVersion of Record
rioxxterms.publicationdate2017-11-24
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-10-03
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.dateDeposit2017-12-12
refterms.depositExceptionpublishedGoldOAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.versionVoRen


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Copyright © The Author(s) 2017. 

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © The Author(s) 2017. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.