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dc.contributor.authorByg Aen
dc.contributor.authorMartin-Ortega Jen
dc.contributor.authorGlenk Ken
dc.contributor.authorNovo Pen
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-22T10:01:51Z
dc.date.available2016-12-22T10:01:51Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citation206
dc.identifier.issn0006-3207
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11262/11166
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2016.12.022
dc.description.abstractMost conservation efforts today recognise the need to involve the public if conservation is to succeed in the long-term. A common approach has been to try to educate the public on why they should care. However, information campaigns are often not effective in changing opinions, let alone behaviour. In this paper, we try establishing the basis for alternative approaches based on understanding people's motivations, perceptions and relationship with nature. Using focus groups, we look at the case of peatlands in Scotland, as an example of an ecosystem which is currently the focus of many conservation and restoration initiatives while seen as ‘problematic’ in the sense that those advocating its conservation assume that the general public does not care about peatlands. Our results show that perceptions of peatlands are ambivalent and many-facetted, and that they can be understood, metaphorically speaking, as good, bad and ugly at the same time: they can be seen as bleak wastelands; beautiful, wild nature and cultural landscape. The multiple and ambivalent views of ecosystems such as peatlands seem not to stem necessarily from lack of knowledge, but to be linked to biophysical characteristics, history, trade-offs between different uses and differences in personal relationships with nature. To ensure the long-term success of conservation, it is vital to understand and manage the public's different and ambivalent views about and attitudes towards landscapes of a greater or lesser degree of wilderness. Many practitioners have now come to accept and manage the fact that there is uncertainty in relation to the outcomes of the biophysical processes underpinning ecosystem restoration. It is now necessary to acknowledge human ambivalence and to find mechanisms for dealing with it. This should become one of the new pillars of conservation practice.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.isformatof14524en
dc.relation.ispartofBiological Conservationen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available after the end of the 18 month embargo period under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectNature perceptionsen
dc.subjectRestorationen
dc.subjectTrade-offsen
dc.subjectCultural landscapesen
dc.subjectWildernessen
dc.titleConservation in the face of ambivalent public perceptions – The case of peatlands as ‘the good, the bad and the ugly’en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscript
dc.extent.pageNumbers181-189
rioxxterms.publicationdate2017/1/17
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-12-20
refterms.accessExceptionpublicationExceedsMaxEmbargoen
refterms.accessExceptionExplanation18 month embargoen
refterms.dateDeposit2016-12-22
refterms.dateEmbargoEnd2018-01-09
refterms.dateFCD2017-02-10
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.versionAMen


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Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

This manuscript version is made available after the end of the 18 month embargo period under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available after the end of the 18 month embargo period under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license